I have had Crohn's disease for almost 40 years. For the last decade it's been fairly well controlled re: gastric symptoms via diet and low-dose naltrexone (LDN) -- though my immune system problems are not. After two surgeries long ago I'm missing a good-sized chunk of my small intestine. As I have a short bowel I have AT LEAST two bowels movements a day, very often three, sometimes four (usually not diarrhea). My colon has not been involved in the disease.
Leafy greens are nutrient powerhouses; spinach, kale, Brussels sprouts, asparagus, collard greens, leeks, peas are all rich in Chlorophyll which helps cleanse the intestinal tract and as a result soothes the colon. They also help detoxify the liver and protect the body from the toxins in the environment. You can boil or steam the veggies, add them in soups or slightly sauté with a little butter or olive oil.
Constipation is no laughing matter. If you aren’t moving your bowels after every meal you eat, then you are, by definition, constipated. Your body has a reflex, known as the gastrocolic reflex, which stimulates movement in the colon when you start eating. The amount of food you eat and the temperature of your food and drinks affect the strength of this reflex. With high fat meals and cold drinks the reflex is stronger, producing a bowel movement more quickly. Caffeine and fructose may also speed up this reflex to the point of being uncomfortable. This is where Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) starts for many people.

And as if that were not enough, it has been estimated by some health experts that as many as 80 percent of Americans are afflicted with intestinal parasites. Many in the medical community would dispute this number, calling it far too high, and if you limit your discussion of parasites to things such as tapeworms and Chinese liver flukes, they are correct. But as soon as you open up to the true nature of the problem and include the lesser known, but far more prevalent, parasites such as Fasciolopsis buskii, the 80 percent figure begins to fall into line. And if you include pathogenic E. coli and Candida yeast overgrowths, then the 80 percent figure is decidedly conservative. Remember, the functional definition of a parasite is an organism that lives in or on another organism (its host) and benefits by deriving nutrients at the host's expense.

It also uses more neurotransmitters to digest and process this junk food, leading to an imbalance in your “feel good” hormones, if not a deficiency. When you are under stress, these hormones are signaled by the brain to “speed up” and this chemical surge causes everything from anxiety, insomnia, trouble swallowing, and the “butterflies” in your stomach, to diarrhea, cramping, and neurotransmitter deficiencies. Colon cleansing: a popular, but misunderstood natural therapy
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