What's pizza made of? White flour and cheese. White flour and water is used to make wallpaper paste. And cheese (casein), at one time, was the primary ingredient in Elmer's Glue (thus Elmer's picture on the front). Ergo, when you eat pizza, you're eating wallpaper paste and Elmer's Glue -- a real stick to your "ribs" kind of meal. Is it any wonder it doesn't pass through your colon cleanly and easily?
Proponents of colon cleansing believe that toxins from your gastrointestinal tract can cause a variety of health problems, such as arthritis and high blood pressure. They believe that colon cleansing improves health by removing toxins, boosting your energy and enhancing your immune system. However, there's no evidence that colon cleansing produces these effects or is beneficial at all.

Psyllium seeds and husks are rich in soluble fiber and have long been used to ease constipation and digestive system upset. As the University of Maryland Medical Center says, "Many well designed studies have shown that psyllium relieves constipation. When combined with water, it swells and produces more bulk, which stimulates the intestines to contract and helps speed the passage of stool through the digestive tract. Psyllium is widely used as a laxative in Asia, Europe, and North America."26 Studies show that in addition to increasing stool weight, supplementing with psyllium seed husk produces stools that are slick and gelatinous. Psyllium is unique in contrast with other viscous fibers. It is resistant to fermentation, whereas other soluble fibers tend to ferment in the colon. That's a significant advantage. Researchers also observed that psyllium seed gel provides lubrication that facilitates the propulsion of colon contents and produces a stool that is bulkier and moister than are stools produced when using comparable amounts of other bowel-regulating fiber sources. The bottom line is that studies have shown that an unfermented gel component of psyllium seed husk promotes laxation as a lubricant in humans.27 
It also uses more neurotransmitters to digest and process this junk food, leading to an imbalance in your “feel good” hormones, if not a deficiency. When you are under stress, these hormones are signaled by the brain to “speed up” and this chemical surge causes everything from anxiety, insomnia, trouble swallowing, and the “butterflies” in your stomach, to diarrhea, cramping, and neurotransmitter deficiencies.

Probiotic foods are fermented foods that contain beneficial bacteria. They tend to have a slightly (or intense) sour taste and are also known for helping to curb cravings! Try sauerkraut, kimchi, natural yogurt and kefir! These foods help populate the gut with more good bacteria, giving our gut a stronger fighting power and ability to function well. It's also a good idea to take a probiotic supplement. Switch up the brand (and strains of bacteria) from time to time to give your body a variety of bacteria.


Each of these is unique, and each requires a different protocol. And they have nothing in common with "detox shampoos" and "detox water," which are, in fact, nonsensical. Then again, can't this same criticism be leveled at the medical community? Consider the term "evidence based medicine," which the medical community loves to claim as its defining principle. Hasn't it too been rendered largely meaningless considering that, according to a study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, only 11% of physicians actually rely on evidenced based medicine for all their treatments?1 It would seem that the medical critics of detoxing are not familiar with John 8:7, "Let he who is without sin cast the first stone."
So after drinking 4 glasses of this stuff and nothing happening, i discovered from other areas on this web site that the kind of sea salt is extremely important. I was using iodized sea salt and took the time to juice everything else myself. Would have been nice if he specified this in the recipe. So, FYI, use UN-IODIZED organic sea salt like Pink Himalayan or grayish-colored Celtic sea salt, not the store bought white stuff, per Dr Axe.
Each of these is unique, and each requires a different protocol. And they have nothing in common with "detox shampoos" and "detox water," which are, in fact, nonsensical. Then again, can't this same criticism be leveled at the medical community? Consider the term "evidence based medicine," which the medical community loves to claim as its defining principle. Hasn't it too been rendered largely meaningless considering that, according to a study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, only 11% of physicians actually rely on evidenced based medicine for all their treatments?1 It would seem that the medical critics of detoxing are not familiar with John 8:7, "Let he who is without sin cast the first stone."
One of the little known aspects of the digestive system is the fact that it acts as the guardian of your body. The digestive tract is the place where the outside world meets the inner world of your bodily functions. Imagine this for a moment. You pick up a piece of food and place it in your mouth, and as it digests it moves through your whole body. Your digestive system is totally responsible for deciding whether or not that piece of food is safe.
Your body can’t digest these foods, so they sit in your colon as old, rotten feces and mucus and impair the digestion of the healthier foods you eat. Pretty soon you’re bloated, tired all the time, depressed, and catching every bug you come in contact with. It comes as no surprise then, according to the National Institutes of Health, up to 70 million Americans are dealing with digestive problems like Constipation or Irritable Bowel Syndrome.
It should be noted that the medical community probably has more trouble with the concept of detoxing than with any other aspect of alternative health and is frequently attacking it. Back in 2009, for example, a report by Voice of Young Science blasted detoxing and found it to be largely nonsense. But in fact, as I explained at the time, the report, was itself largely nonsense. The researchers chose the widest definition possible for detoxing including detox shampoos and spa therapies in their analysis, and they used very little science to back their claims--mostly personal opinion. The one valid point they did make is that the word "detox" has become so widely used that it has lost much of its meaning. That is true, and that's why I always clarify what kind of detoxing I'm referring to such as: Comparison of colon-cleansing methods in preparation for colonoscopy
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