Directions Take 1 to 2 capsules at bedtime with 8 ounces of water for up to 15 days, or as directed by a healthcare professional. Do not repeat cleansing program for at least 6 to 8 weeks. Consult your healthcare professional if you have any existing medical conditions. Within 20 min of waking up, it is highly beneficial to drink 8oz of pure water before drinking Zerotea. Bring water to a light simmer, not boiling. Once water is ready, allow tea to steep for 3 to 5 minutes. Drink hot or cold. You can add raw local honey for the health benefits and taste. TIP: The longer you brew the tea the more antioxidants are released; steeping long enough is important. Follow this routine for 14 or 28 days at a time and see the benefits. Suggested Use: As a dietary supplement, take up to 5 capsules at bedtime with 8-12 oz of water, on an empty stomach for 7-10 days or until desired cleanse has been attained. Decrease dose for maintenance. Daily dosage will vary depending on individual and intended purpose. Results may vary. As a dietary supplement, this product may be used for occasional use or as part of a cleansing program. For occasional use only, take one (1) capsule in the morning and one (1) capsule in the evening, always with a meal. For intensive cleanse, take up to three (3) capsules per day. Do not take for more than 15 days. Discontinue use if not well tolerated. Consult your healthcare provider before using this product if your are pregnant, breastfeeding or have a known medical condition. For occasional use only. Take one (1) or two (2) capsules, at bedtime with 8 ounces of water daily for up to 14 days. Start with one (1) capsule at bedtime for the first 3-4 days or as directed by a healthcare professional. Do not repeat cleansing program for at least 6-8 weeks. Consult your healthcare provider before using this product if your are pregnant, breastfeeding or have a known medical condition.
Barberry rootbark contains berberine, a bitter alkaloid that aids in the secretion of bile and is good for liver health,15 acts as a mild purgative, helps regulate the digestive processes, and improves insulin sensitivity.16 The antibacterial properties of berbamine, another alkaloid found in barberry, have shown activity against Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Salmonella, Shigella and E. coli. It has anti-microbial properties that are especially beneficial for the skin and intestinal tract.17 And finally, barberry has a beneficial effect on blood pressure by causing a dilatation of the blood vessels.
Wolf said she would worry about people with kidney disease or heart problems trying colon cleanses, because these individuals already have trouble maintaining fluid balance in their bodies, and the electrolyte shifts could be an issue. She said she would also tell people with gastrointestinal problems, such as Crohn's disease (a condition involving inflammation in the GI tract), ulcerative colitis (which involves inflammation in the large intestine), and recurrent diverticulitis (in which a person develops inflamed pouches in the wall of the colon) to avoid colonics.
Following the session, I didn’t feel very different. I’d once read a post-colonic account where the writer recalled feeling so clean afterward that she craved nothing other than water and cucumbers. Well, that wasn’t the case for me! I was hungry! Sandra said that I should stick to soft food for the rest of the day so I had some boiled squash and rice, but I was craving a thick slice of pizza. My stomach did feel empty, but not much more than it would after any substantial “movement.”
If you are not sure whether a colon cleanse problem is safe or advisable in your particular situation, the best thing you can do is talk to a doctor or health professional about what options you might have. It may seem a little embarrassing to have this conversation, but trust us when we say that they’ve heard it all before, and when it comes to anything in life, you should always put your health first. The last thing you want to do is start a colon cleanse in order to increase your wellbeing or weight loss chances, and find that you have simply made your situation worse.
Each of these is unique, and each requires a different protocol. And they have nothing in common with "detox shampoos" and "detox water," which are, in fact, nonsensical. Then again, can't this same criticism be leveled at the medical community? Consider the term "evidence based medicine," which the medical community loves to claim as its defining principle. Hasn't it too been rendered largely meaningless considering that, according to a study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, only 11% of physicians actually rely on evidenced based medicine for all their treatments?1 It would seem that the medical critics of detoxing are not familiar with John 8:7, "Let he who is without sin cast the first stone."
A number of studies suggest that psyllium may also be effective in lowering cholesterol,28 promoting weight loss (it makes you feel full), and aiding in the relief of numerous other conditions. For example: studies have shown that psyllium can significantly decrease serum glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetic outpatients.29 (Note: Psyllium can make tetracycline antibiotics less effective, so consult your doctor for guidance before using psyllium while on a regimen of antibiotics.)
A healthy gut is the foundation of a healthy body. Unfortunately many of us feel less than vibrant and vital and struggle with digestive issues or food sensitivities and a tendency to catch every cold that pass us by. Interestingly about 70% of the cells that make up our immune system are in the wall of our gut. Yet a sluggish digestion, poor diet, stress (a big trouble maker!), environmental toxins and food toxins can really take it's toll.
And as if that were not enough, it has been estimated by some health experts that as many as 80 percent of Americans are afflicted with intestinal parasites. Many in the medical community would dispute this number, calling it far too high, and if you limit your discussion of parasites to things such as tapeworms and Chinese liver flukes, they are correct. But as soon as you open up to the true nature of the problem and include the lesser known, but far more prevalent, parasites such as Fasciolopsis buskii, the 80 percent figure begins to fall into line. And if you include pathogenic E. coli and Candida yeast overgrowths, then the 80 percent figure is decidedly conservative. Remember, the functional definition of a parasite is an organism that lives in or on another organism (its host) and benefits by deriving nutrients at the host's expense. Colon Cleansing Information
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