It is our belief that no single program works for everyone. Some are more difficult to implement and, therefore, best for highly motivated individuals; a program cannot work if you are unable to stick with it. Others can be too restrictive…and even dangerous, requiring consumption of only one food group or liquid. The bottom line is that you need to find the program that best suits you and your lifestyle.

Foods lacking in fiber move through the digestive tract at one-quarter the pace of high-fiber choices. This slow-moving food produces excess mucous that literally sticks to the intestinal walls, weighing the intestinal tract down with pounds of decaying fecal matter. Colon cleansing has the potential to aid weight loss; some people claim to have lost up to 20 pounds over the course of a month. The average human colon weighs about four pounds empty and can hold up to eight meals' worth of food before digestion finally occurs. A colon cleansing can result in significant weight loss and kick-start your metabolism, as well as refocus your attention on better food choices and whole-body wellness.


Chlorophyll does a lot of wonders for the human body. It’s useful as a digestive tract cleanse and may prevent colorectal cancer, according to a study. A chlorophyll enema, in fact, has become a health trend for this very reason. However, you don’t need to shove anything down your rectum to derive the same benefits that you can get from consuming green veggies.
Fibre recommendations are between 20 to 35 grams a day, but the modern affluent diet provides only about 10 g. (High amounts of fibre, however, should be avoided during inflammatory bowel conditions.) To meet the fibre requirement, consume daily five or more servings of vegetables and fruits, and six or more of whole grains. A half cup of fruit or vegetables or one cup of leafy, raw greens makes one serving. One grain serving is one slice of bread or one-half cup of cooked cereal, grain or pasta.

First of all, there is no proof that the senna was responsible. It was merely an assumption made by the doctors. The argument was that it disrupted her electrolyte balance. And yes, in her particular case, it may have. If you use senna or cascara sagrada or aloe, not as an aid to proper bowel movements (as in a corrective formula), but in large amounts as a purgative to stop from absorbing calories (as in a dieter's tea), you will have diarrhea end up passing a lot of electrolytes -- but probably not enough to affect the heart unless some other factors are in play.

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It should be noted that the medical community probably has more trouble with the concept of detoxing than with any other aspect of alternative health and is frequently attacking it. Back in 2009, for example, a report by Voice of Young Science blasted detoxing and found it to be largely nonsense. But in fact, as I explained at the time, the report, was itself largely nonsense. The researchers chose the widest definition possible for detoxing including detox shampoos and spa therapies in their analysis, and they used very little science to back their claims--mostly personal opinion. The one valid point they did make is that the word "detox" has become so widely used that it has lost much of its meaning. That is true, and that's why I always clarify what kind of detoxing I'm referring to such as: Comparison of colon-cleansing methods in preparation for colonoscopy
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